Drawn to Life Review (DS)

by November 2nd, 2007

A platformer with a unique twist.

Drawn to Life.
It is always nice to see a game that bucks the trends a little. One that takes a simple idea or a genre and just spices it up a bit. You know that it is not really ground breaking, but it is just enough to make the game stick its head up out of the crowd and say; “Look at me, I’m a bit different”.

Such is the case with Drawn to Life. But let’s start from the beginning.

Finally there is a game that makes real use of the DS touch screen.

You are the creator. You created the world of Raposa by drawing every aspect of it in the Book of Life. But all was not well and one of your creations, Wilfre, decides that he is better than you and begins to add his own dark, twisted drawings to the book of life. On discovering this you are so appalled that you lock the Book of Life away and turn your back on Raposa.

Life the Raposa went on, until Wilfre steals the Book of Life and in a fit of rage tears it to pieces, but not before bringing some of his creations to life. Now he and his creations are wreaking havoc on the peaceful people of the village. In a desperate attempt to rid the village of this evil, a little girl called Mari comes to you for help, begging you to save what you had created. Taking pity on her you decide to create a hero to save the village. So you posses the mannequin in your old library and the fun begins. You must find the pages of the Book of Life and rid the Raposas of the dark clouds.

From the start you will discover this game is a bit different. It has a gimmick. A gimmick that is actually really good! You can draw your own hero. Select from some templates, then using the stylus you create you very own character for the game. But it doesn’t end there…oh no. You get to draw items that exist in the world, such as clouds that will act as platforms, snow guns that will help you later, vehicles, trees and much more. Before long the world looks unique to your drawing style, which in my case looks like a 2 year olds nightmare!

Ok so it is a gimmick, but it really adds to the fun nature of this game. You care for your lovingly created hero. You wince as parts of your drawing fall off the manikin as it gets hurt. You will feel swells of pride as you jump on your badly drawn clouds. Finally there is a game that makes real use of the DS touch screen.

The game its self is fairly basic. It has two main sections, a top down, RPG style view in the village and a side scrolling plat former for the main game. The village is a place where you can hone your drawing skills, bone up on the story and then enter different parts of the world. The platformer part of the game plays a bit like a simple Mario, with you jumping on bad guys (and later on shooting at them). Basic but fun.

Ultimately this is a game aimed at kids. It is simple, colourful and fun. The drawing aspect will give them a sense that they have created the game and most will love that! Adults will enjoy it for a while as well, but will soon tire of the simplicity.

This is something a bit different that will keep the kids quite for a long time as they try to make the world a brighter place!!!

The Good: Unique drawing system. Accessible straight away.
The Bad: May be a bit too simplistic for some.


Drawn to Life Drawn to Life Drawn to Life Drawn to Life 


Silver Y AwardSilver Y Award
4 4 / 5
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Andrzej Marczewski

Owner of YARS
Well, lets start by saying that I run YARS. Gaming has been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember! I felt there were just too few games review sites out there, so created YARS to fill that sorry looking gap....

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About Andrzej Marczewski

Well, lets start by saying that I run YARS. Gaming has been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember! I felt there were just too few games review sites out there, so created YARS to fill that sorry looking gap....

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